Friday, April 12, 2013
Vine is blowing up, and its popularity is well deserved.  The app just oozes with delight. When you think of macro trends like: visual mobile web (Instagram et al), shrinking attention spans, the resurgence of the animated GIF… the Vine 6-second video format feels so well-timed.
In an interview with the WSJ Robert De Niro was recently quoted re: Vine:

"Six seconds of beginning, middle and end. I was just trying to time on my iPhone six seconds just to get a sense of what that is. It can actually be a long time. One one-thousand, two one-thousand, three one-thousand, four one-thousand, five one-thousand, six one-thousand - you can tell a whole story in six seconds."

One of my favorite documentaries is Lumiere and Company. The picture above is a screenshot from the documentary. It’s the story of 41 famous directors who were asked to make a short film using an old, transformational device called the Cinematographe (invented in the 1890s by the Lumiere Brothers… it was one of the original moving film cameras).  
The shorts the directors created had to adhere to the following rules (in the spirit of the original Cinematographe movies):
A short may be no longer than 52 seconds
No synchronized sound
No more than three takes
The resulting documentary shows all 41 52-second movies and some of the making of those movies.  It’s a great watch. David Lynch’s short film ends up stealing the show, so if you watch nothing else, don’t miss that.
I bring this up because I’d love to see a compilation of famous directors’ Vines!  This needs to happen. Like De Niro said, six seconds is enough time to tell a story. It would be the film equivalent of Six Word Stories. Internet: make it so!

Vine is blowing up, and its popularity is well deserved.  The app just oozes with delight. When you think of macro trends like: visual mobile web (Instagram et al), shrinking attention spans, the resurgence of the animated GIF… the Vine 6-second video format feels so well-timed.

In an interview with the WSJ Robert De Niro was recently quoted re: Vine:

"Six seconds of beginning, middle and end. I was just trying to time on my iPhone six seconds just to get a sense of what that is. It can actually be a long time. One one-thousand, two one-thousand, three one-thousand, four one-thousand, five one-thousand, six one-thousand - you can tell a whole story in six seconds."

One of my favorite documentaries is Lumiere and Company. The picture above is a screenshot from the documentary. It’s the story of 41 famous directors who were asked to make a short film using an old, transformational device called the Cinematographe (invented in the 1890s by the Lumiere Brothers… it was one of the original moving film cameras).  

The shorts the directors created had to adhere to the following rules (in the spirit of the original Cinematographe movies):

  1. A short may be no longer than 52 seconds
  2. No synchronized sound
  3. No more than three takes

The resulting documentary shows all 41 52-second movies and some of the making of those movies.  It’s a great watch. David Lynch’s short film ends up stealing the show, so if you watch nothing else, don’t miss that.

I bring this up because I’d love to see a compilation of famous directors’ Vines!  This needs to happen. Like De Niro said, six seconds is enough time to tell a story. It would be the film equivalent of Six Word Stories. Internet: make it so!

Notes

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