Friday, November 30, 2012
The MoMA is acquiring iconic video game properties for their permanent collection according to TheNextWeb.  I love this. I’m delighted that video games are being appreciated as art.  I only wish popular video game criticism would move past 10-point scoring systems and reflect more of the artistic values that the MoMA is now recognizing.
When I was a kid, some of my friends and I collected baseball cards. We would look up value in Beckett guide (part of the reason I love Priceonomics #investor) to trade with each other and wonder with awe how cool it would be to own some of the awesome rookie cards like Mickey Mantle from 1951 that would now incredibly valuable. Our parents generation had easy access to these cards and many of them collected as kids too, but due to attic-cleaning-parents or other more-or-less “natural disasters” none of our parents retained their old card collections.
I remember wondering as a kid what my baseball card collection would be worth when I grew up.  So far, there has been no appreciation (i’ll continue to hold the candle for that dream).  But, what I didn’t realize at the time, and recently learned, is that video games were our generation’s baseball cards, but we just didn’t know it yet.
Some rare games are already fetching 5-digit prices.  I wouldn’t be surprised if 20 years from now these values increase by an order of magnitude. 
(Hat tip to @parislemon where I found this content about the MoMA via reblog.)

The MoMA is acquiring iconic video game properties for their permanent collection according to TheNextWeb.  I love this. I’m delighted that video games are being appreciated as art.  I only wish popular video game criticism would move past 10-point scoring systems and reflect more of the artistic values that the MoMA is now recognizing.

When I was a kid, some of my friends and I collected baseball cards. We would look up value in Beckett guide (part of the reason I love Priceonomics #investor) to trade with each other and wonder with awe how cool it would be to own some of the awesome rookie cards like Mickey Mantle from 1951 that would now incredibly valuable. Our parents generation had easy access to these cards and many of them collected as kids too, but due to attic-cleaning-parents or other more-or-less “natural disasters” none of our parents retained their old card collections.

I remember wondering as a kid what my baseball card collection would be worth when I grew up.  So far, there has been no appreciation (i’ll continue to hold the candle for that dream).  But, what I didn’t realize at the time, and recently learned, is that video games were our generation’s baseball cards, but we just didn’t know it yet.

Some rare games are already fetching 5-digit prices.  I wouldn’t be surprised if 20 years from now these values increase by an order of magnitude. 

(Hat tip to @parislemon where I found this content about the MoMA via reblog.)